Equipment Guide to Wildlife Flash Photography

Most wildlife photographers undervalue the importance of having/ using a flash and, in my opinion, is a huge mistake.  Utilizing a speedlight allows you to add some fill flash to a photo or for total illumination of a particular subject. Have you ever wanted to add a little light when you’re photographing an animal?  Utilizing a little fill flash will give you pleasing results by adding some life to the image by the addition of a catch light in the eyes.  Getting the right gear for flash can be confusing, so hopefully I’m going to demystify the setup. 

Canon 100-400mm f/ 4.5-5.6 IS II Review

Prior to the introduction of the 100-400 f/ 4.5- 5.6 IS II, Canon has had an apparent gap in their telephoto lens lineup.  The previous version was a slow- focusing lens, which caused photographers to opt for either fixed focal length offerings, shorter zoom options, or lenses made by third- party manufacturers.  Canon drastically improved the performance of the lens by enhancing the sharpness, autofocus speed, and some other characteristics.  However, the new lens also has some negatives. 

Tripod Selection

There is a place, and time, for hand holding supertelephoto lenses.  Hand holding larger lenses allows you to move more dynamically, however after prolong period fatigue will kick in.  For me, a good tripod has four main characteristics: stability, portability, functionality, and durability.  Tripods are expensive, and so are your lenses.  Buying a cheaper tripod will save you money in the short- run, and just like anything cheap you buy now, 99% of the time you will end up upgrading.  However, don’t use price to determine quality; there are many expensive pieces of junk (Gitzo). 

Guide to Capturing Wildlife Up Close & Personal

Capturing wildlife up close and personal can prove challenging for nature photographers—and also worthwhile. Shortening the distance between camera and subject allows the photographer to experience different points of view, and wide-angle lenses can throw a subject into a strikingly larger-than-life perspective. While successfully capturing such pictures requires more than a little skill, the fundamentals are simple. Every close encounter has three main parts: location, approach, and exit.